Select Page

NOTIFICATION OF COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT

The notification process outlined below is consistent with procedures that are suggested within the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

  • If a person believes that material on this website infringes their copyright, they may send a written notice to The Slighltys, as described below. We will attempt to remove or disable all allegedly infringing material.

  • We will attempt to notify any user who posts allegedly infringement material to our website. The user has the right to request that the material be re-enabled. If such a request is made, we will re-enable the material unless and until both parties jointly ask us to remove it or a court orders us to remove it.

RIGHTS OF THE COPYRIGHT OWNER

Only copyright owners can report suspected infringement. If you are not the copyright owner (or the authorized representative of the owner) you cannot make a report of copyright infringement. You may be liable for damages, including court costs and attorneys fees, if you materially misrepresent that content on a website is copyright infringing. If in doubt, consult an attorney.

WHAT WE REQUIRE TO PROCESS YOUR REQUEST

In the event that you make a claim regarding copyright infringement, we will need the following information to further investigate your claim:

  • Your name, mailing address, telephone number and email address;
  • sufficient detail about the copyrighted work;
  • the URL or other specific location on our websites that contains the material that you claim infringes your copyright;
  • a statement by you—the copyright owner or agent—that you have a good faith belief that the disputed use is not authorized by the copyright owner, its agent, or the law (i.e. “I have a good faith belief that use of the copyrighted materials described above as allegedly infringing is not authorized by the copyright owner, its agent, or the law.”);
  • a statement by you—the copyright owner or agent—that the information contained in your notice is accurate and that you attest under the penalty of perjury that you are the copyright owner or that you are authorized to act on the copyright owner’s behalf (i.e. “I swear, under penalty of perjury, that the information in the notification is accurate and that I am the copyright owner or am authorized to act on behalf of the owner of an exclusive right that is allegedly infringed.”); and,
  • an electronic or physical signature of the owner of the copyright or a person authorized to act on the owner’s behalf.

Please send your notice to the following address:

The Slightlys
915 N. Ave. 57
Los Angeles, CA 90042
admin@theslightlys.com
Attn: DMCA Complaint

After The Slightlys receive a proper written notice, we will expeditiously remove or disable the allegedly infringing content, regardless of the nature of the copyright. We will document those alleged infringements on which we act. Also, we will notify the user and, if requested, provide the report to the user. Please note that in addition to being forwarded to the user who provided the allegedly infringing content, a copy of this legal notice (with your personal information removed) may be sent to a third-party which may publish and/or annotate it. We may exclude egregious or repeat infringers from our websites.

THE USERS RIGHTS

If a user of our websites believes that their content was removed and/or disabled by mistake or misidentified, the user can send us a written counter-notification which includes the following:

  • User name, mailing address, telephone number and email address;
  • Identification of the material that has been removed or disabled and the URL or other specific location on our websites at which the material appeared before it was removed or disabled;
  • A statement that the user consents to the jurisdiction of the Federal District Court in which the user’s address is located, or Los Angeles, CA if the user’s address is outside the United States;
  • A statement under penalty of perjury that the user has a good faith belief that the material in question was removed or disabled as a result of mistake or misidentification of the material to be removed or disabled (i.e. “I swear, under penalty of perjury, that I have a good faith belief that each search result, message, or other item of content identified above was removed or disabled as a result of a mistake or misidentification of the material to be removed or disabled, or that the material identified by the complainant has been removed or disabled at the URL identified and will no longer be shown.”); and,
  • the user’s physical or electronic signature.

The Slightlys will restore the removed or disabled content following ten (10) business days from the date that we received a proper written counter notification, unless our copyright agent first receives notice that a court action has been filed to restrain the user from engaging in infringing activity related to the removed or disabled content.

What Is the DMCA?

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law that implements two 1996 treaties of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). It criminalizes production and dissemination of technology, devices, or services intended to circumvent measures (commonly known as digital rights management or DRM) that control access to copyrighted works. It also criminalizes the act of circumventing an access control, whether or not there is actual infringement of copyright itself. In addition, the DMCA heightens the penalties for copyright infringement on theInternet. Passed on October 12, 1998, by a unanimous vote in the United States Senate and signed into law by President Bill Clinton on October 28, 1998, the DMCA amended Title 17 of theUnited States Code to extend the reach of copyright, while limiting the liability of the providers of online services for copyright infringement by their users.

The DMCA’s principal innovation in the field of copyright is the exemption from direct and indirect liability of Internet service providers and other intermediaries. This exemption was adopted by theEuropean Union in the Electronic Commerce Directive 2000. The Copyright Directive 2001 implemented the 1996 WIPO Copyright Treaty in the EU.

Skip to toolbar